Dark Matter: AfroFuturism

Reblogged from nocturnalphantasmagoria

medievalpoc:

CONTEMPORARY ART WEEK AT MEDIEVALPOC

You asked for it, you got it! Starting this Monday (4/14/14), Medievalpoc will be featuring Contemporary Art and Artists of color influenced by European Art History. Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Mannerist, Classical, Ancient, Fantasy, Early Modern, you name it, it’ll be here! Everything from oil on canvas to performance art.

Also featured will be topical essays exploring our ideas about anachronisms, cultural exchange and appropriation, the use of particular palettes to invoke associations with historical works, Fantasy and Fan Art, character design, RPGs, Art and Identity, and the policing of self-expression in popular culture.

Follow. Ask. Submit.

Artists featured in this post*: Yin Xin, Leo and Diane Dillon, Terrance Houle, charcoalfeather, Toyin Odutola, Kehinde Wiley, Jamea Richmond-Edwards, hauntedmomsanon, Ikenaga Yasenuri, and S. Ross Browne.


*If you see your art here and would like it removed for any reason, message me and I will remove it ASAP.

Reblogged from aphotic-eniola

gadevoted:

Happy birthday, Zora Neale Hurston (1891 - 1960) ~~ flawless, fearless, fabulous, hero ~~ author, researcher, anthropologist

“I have the nerve to walk my own way, however hard, in my search for reality, rather than climb upon the rattling wagon of wishful illusions.”

gradientlair:

Today’s Google doodle is in celebration of legendary folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston's 123rd birthday. (January 7, 1891– January 28, 1960)

Reblogged from afrodiaspores

gradientlair:

Today’s Google doodle is in celebration of legendary folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston's 123rd birthday. (January 7, 1891– January 28, 1960)

aadatart:

Sarah asked: “So what exactly is Afrofuturism?”
—
#ASKAADAT is an ongoing question-and-answer series where you can ask any questions about African art, art of the African diaspora, about AADAT, or somewhere in between.
Send us your questions on twitter (@aadatart) and #ASKAADAT, or on tumblr via our askbox.
—
Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | YouTube

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

aadatart:

Sarah asked: “So what exactly is Afrofuturism?”

#ASKAADAT is an ongoing question-and-answer series where you can ask any questions about African art, art of the African diaspora, about AADAT, or somewhere in between.

Send us your questions on twitter (@aadatart) and #ASKAADAT, or on tumblr via our askbox.

Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | YouTube

lostinurbanism:

Mequitta Ahuja, Afrogalaxy

Reblogged from lostinurbanism

lostinurbanism:

Mequitta Ahuja, Afrogalaxy

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

(Source: bluelightvine)


King Britt, A Sonic Journey Into AfroFuturism

Reblogged from alsiealsiealsie

King Britt, A Sonic Journey Into AfroFuturism

manufactoriel:

#Gif #ghana

Reblogged from epeba

manufactoriel:

#Gif #ghana

(Source: shakeshakebynontsi)

"Black existence and science fiction are one in the same."

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

Kodwo Eshun, “Further Considerations of Afrofuturism,” The New Centennial Review, Summer 2003. (via shadowstookshape)

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

afrofuturistaffair:

Official Dark Phase Space footage from resident Designer Android D1L0 & The L.Park Project coming soon! In the meantime, please enjoy some  behind the scenes shots from Invisible Universe Documentary filmmakers!

laviedechato:

Bruce Gilden. Photo noir et blanc.

Reblogged from endilletante

laviedechato:

Bruce Gilden. Photo noir et blanc.

Reblogged from akilivumbi

akilivumbi:

Shabazz Palaces - Are you… Can you… Were you? (Felt)

semioticapocalypse:

Bruce Gilden. A day at McDonalds in Times Square, 2001.
[::SemAp::]

Reblogged from endilletante

semioticapocalypse:

Bruce Gilden. A day at McDonalds in Times Square, 2001.

[::SemAp::]

Reblogged from randomberlinchick

seshatarchitecture:

Gurunsi architecture in Burkina Faso and Ghana

soulbrotherv2:


Super Black: American Pop Culture and Black Superheroes by Adilifu Nama
Super Black places the appearance of black superheroes alongside broad and sweeping cultural trends in American politics and pop culture, which reveals how black superheroes are not disposable pop products, but rather a fascinating racial phenomenon through which futuristic expressions and fantastic visions of black racial identity and symbolic political meaning are presented. Adilifu Nama sees the value—and finds new avenues for exploring racial identity—in black superheroes who are often dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts.
Nama examines seminal black comic book superheroes such as Black Panther, Black Lightning, Storm, Luke Cage, Blade, the Falcon, Nubia, and others, some of whom also appear on the small and large screens, as well as how the imaginary black superhero has come to life in the image of President Barack Obama. Super Black explores how black superheroes are a powerful source of racial meaning, narrative, and imagination in American society that express a myriad of racial assumptions, political perspectives, and fantastic (re)imaginings of black identity. The book also demonstrates how these figures overtly represent or implicitly signify social discourse and accepted wisdom concerning notions of racial reciprocity, equality, forgiveness, and ultimately, racial justice.

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

soulbrotherv2:

Super Black: American Pop Culture and Black Superheroes by Adilifu Nama

Super Black places the appearance of black superheroes alongside broad and sweeping cultural trends in American politics and pop culture, which reveals how black superheroes are not disposable pop products, but rather a fascinating racial phenomenon through which futuristic expressions and fantastic visions of black racial identity and symbolic political meaning are presented. Adilifu Nama sees the value—and finds new avenues for exploring racial identity—in black superheroes who are often dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts.

Nama examines seminal black comic book superheroes such as Black Panther, Black Lightning, Storm, Luke Cage, Blade, the Falcon, Nubia, and others, some of whom also appear on the small and large screens, as well as how the imaginary black superhero has come to life in the image of President Barack Obama. Super Black explores how black superheroes are a powerful source of racial meaning, narrative, and imagination in American society that express a myriad of racial assumptions, political perspectives, and fantastic (re)imaginings of black identity. The book also demonstrates how these figures overtly represent or implicitly signify social discourse and accepted wisdom concerning notions of racial reciprocity, equality, forgiveness, and ultimately, racial justice.