Dark Matter: AfroFuturism

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

poc-creators:

“‘Djin’ is the name of a spirit that’s in a wind. That wind blows every 30 years. It selects people but nobody knows why or who. It blows, and removes whatever uncertainties a person has about whatever it is they care about the most, leaving them to take action.”

This is how director Hawa Essuman introduces the video story of her new film Djin, that she has been writing in recent months, and which bears the name of a magical wind which crosses the lives of the protagonists.  

Along with the transformations of each character, the film offers a fresh look at the locations in which it is set, along the Kenyan coastline.
 
Hawa Essuman is a young director of Ghanaian origin who is based in Nairobi.  She first approached the world of cinema as an actress, but later decided to focus solely on directing.  In 2008, after short films, ads for television and music videos, she made the feature length film  Soul Boy, which was produced by Tom Tykwer, and presented at more than 40 international festivals, where it won numerous awards including the audience award at the International Film Festival RotterdamMORE

Part 2: Treatment and Production

Part 3: Writing

Part 4: Crowdfunding

Part 5: Fund

Part 6: Location

Published on Apr 2, 2014

the director’s eye project is supported by lettera27 Foundation of Milan and promotes African cinema, in particular the writing and preproduction phases. These are some of the most delicate periods in the development of a film project and are rarely supported by other funds or prizes. the director’s eye was launched in 2012, in collaboration with the Festival de Cinema Africano de Cordoba and the co-production forum Africa Produce, and curated by Vanessa Lanari.

A jury comprising Nigerian director Newton I. Aduaka and South African producer Steven Markovitz selected Hawa Essuman’s Djin as the winning project for lettera27’s fund. During the course of 2013, after the award was assigned, lettera27 followed the work on Djin and offered its author the opportunity to talk about the project in a series of videos.

Video by Istituto Micropunta Interviews: Claudia D’Alonzo and Vanessa Lanari Video Footage: Hawa Essuman Editing: Istituto Micropunta Sound: Istituto Micropunta Camera DOP: Flavio Toffoli Project Manager: Cristina Perillo Thanks to: Newton Aduaka, Mane Cisneros, Carlos Dominguez, Steven Markovitz and Moleskine This video is realized in CC BY SA www.lettera27.org

diasporadash:

Three women from Guadeloupe, on Ellis Island, about 1910, by Augustus Sherman - Source: New York Public Library 
Curated by Carlos Miguel Jimenez

Reblogged from yearningforunity

diasporadash:

Three women from Guadeloupe, on Ellis Island, about 1910, by Augustus Sherman - Source: New York Public Library 

Curated by Carlos Miguel Jimenez

devoya:

stokely

Reblogged from devoya

devoya:

stokely

(Source: marination)

Near Kin: A Collection of Words and Art Inspired by Octavia Estelle Butler

Reblogged from ladyfresh

samueldelany:

image

Near Kin explores, questions, and pays tribute the multifaceted brilliance of Octavia Butler’s work through poetry, prose and essays by writers all over the world. Among these works are:

There’s the question over a writer’s reasons for self-censorship and what it means to the future of racial…

wrenartist:

Octavia Butler said…

Reblogged from diasporadash

wrenartist:

Octavia Butler said…

guspewe:

Omar Sy as Bishop in X-Men: Days of Future Past.

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

guspewe:

Omar Sy as Bishop in X-Men: Days of Future Past.

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

glproductions:

Back in February, Vernon Reid debuted his experimental theatrical performance and video art installation, “Artificial Africa,” at Dixon Place in New York City, to explore “the Africa of our minds”. Check out this episode of OkayAfrica TV breaking down the project and make sure to cop tickets of the legendary guitar hero playing alongside King Britt, Imani Uzuri and others as part of The Beautiful Noise, a tribute to Sun Ra, one of the predecessors of the Afrofuturistic movement.

afrofuturistaffair:

sonofbaldwin:

Amiri Baraka, Maya Angelou, and Toni Morrison at James Baldwin’s funeral, December 1987 (H/T The Anti Intellect Blog)

Black writers

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

afrofuturistaffair:

sonofbaldwin:

Amiri Baraka, Maya Angelou, and Toni Morrison at James Baldwin’s funeral, December 1987 (H/T The Anti Intellect Blog)

Black writers

"Afrofuturism, for me, is about speculating on the potentiality of what is known about technology and physics to create metaphors that allow me to explore an African diasporic past and generate possible narratives for the future…Afrofuturism is also a rumination on memories to which I have no access. My investment in it as a production strategy has run its course; Afrofuturism provides a way to investigate trauma very explicitly. But we only reenact traumas, don’t we? We don’t reenact prom night, or our favorite birthday party. This is a problem—it doesn’t seem to fix things; it amplifies them. There’s gotta be something else, the after-the-trauma."

Reblogged from blackfeminismlives

Cauleen Smith, Cauleen Smith by Leslie Hewitt BOMB 116/Summer 2011
(via shadowstookshape)

Reblogged from nocturnalphantasmagoria

medievalpoc:

CONTEMPORARY ART WEEK AT MEDIEVALPOC

You asked for it, you got it! Starting this Monday (4/14/14), Medievalpoc will be featuring Contemporary Art and Artists of color influenced by European Art History. Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Mannerist, Classical, Ancient, Fantasy, Early Modern, you name it, it’ll be here! Everything from oil on canvas to performance art.

Also featured will be topical essays exploring our ideas about anachronisms, cultural exchange and appropriation, the use of particular palettes to invoke associations with historical works, Fantasy and Fan Art, character design, RPGs, Art and Identity, and the policing of self-expression in popular culture.

Follow. Ask. Submit.

Artists featured in this post*: Yin Xin, Leo and Diane Dillon, Terrance Houle, charcoalfeather, Toyin Odutola, Kehinde Wiley, Jamea Richmond-Edwards, hauntedmomsanon, Ikenaga Yasenuri, and S. Ross Browne.


*If you see your art here and would like it removed for any reason, message me and I will remove it ASAP.

Reblogged from aphotic-eniola

gadevoted:

Happy birthday, Zora Neale Hurston (1891 - 1960) ~~ flawless, fearless, fabulous, hero ~~ author, researcher, anthropologist

“I have the nerve to walk my own way, however hard, in my search for reality, rather than climb upon the rattling wagon of wishful illusions.”

gradientlair:

Today’s Google doodle is in celebration of legendary folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston's 123rd birthday. (January 7, 1891– January 28, 1960)

Reblogged from afrodiaspores

gradientlair:

Today’s Google doodle is in celebration of legendary folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston's 123rd birthday. (January 7, 1891– January 28, 1960)

aadatart:

Sarah asked: “So what exactly is Afrofuturism?”
—
#ASKAADAT is an ongoing question-and-answer series where you can ask any questions about African art, art of the African diaspora, about AADAT, or somewhere in between.
Send us your questions on twitter (@aadatart) and #ASKAADAT, or on tumblr via our askbox.
—
Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | YouTube

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

aadatart:

Sarah asked: “So what exactly is Afrofuturism?”

#ASKAADAT is an ongoing question-and-answer series where you can ask any questions about African art, art of the African diaspora, about AADAT, or somewhere in between.

Send us your questions on twitter (@aadatart) and #ASKAADAT, or on tumblr via our askbox.

Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | YouTube

lostinurbanism:

Mequitta Ahuja, Afrogalaxy

Reblogged from lostinurbanism

lostinurbanism:

Mequitta Ahuja, Afrogalaxy

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair