Dark Matter: AfroFuturism

Reblogged from foundlovedshared

the-goddamazon:

vinebox:

quisqueyasworld:

wzrdkelley:

sleptonshawty:

lifesentences:

sexualanomaly:

Hilarious but fun science fact! The reason why this works is because of the rhythm syncopation. All of these songs (and most songs by black musicians) have 2/4 bass count. (1 and 2 and 1 and 2) rather than a 4/4 count ( 1 and 1 and 1 and 1) beat you see in other genre. This 2/4 count is similar to the human heartbeat. It’s why we have a a better grasp of rhythm in music and in dance.

reposting for these receipts ^^

Beautiful

But can I just get a mix of all these songs

This is too.cool!

Best thing ever

Science. :D

(Source: gameofthots)

darvinasafo:

Happy Black History Month
BLACK AUGUST.

Reblogged from teddythemonster

darvinasafo:

Happy Black History Month

BLACK AUGUST.

Reblogged from restlessmindsandconstantfetishes

cavetocanvas:

Carrie Mae Weems, You Became a Scientific Profile (top), An Anthropological Debate (middle), and And I Cried (bottom) from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried,  1995–96. Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Copyright Carrie Mae Weems.

Reblogged from restlessmindsandconstantfetishes

(Source: linxspiration)

bvsedjesus:

lovelyandbrown:

ohhsweetinsanityy:

"True peace is not merely the absence of tension, it is the presence of justice."

this actually is a gorgeous, powerful shot.

amazing picture

Reblogged from jadeivy

bvsedjesus:

lovelyandbrown:

ohhsweetinsanityy:

"True peace is not merely the absence of tension, it is the presence of justice."

this actually is a gorgeous, powerful shot.

amazing picture

Reblogged from jadeivy

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale

As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.

View more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

 

Reblogged from thewaking

thewaking:

…short animated interview with the legendary Fela Kuti.

(Source: thesmithian)

Reblogged from eternallybeautifullyblack

soulbrotherv2:

Black Sci-Fi - Section 1

Extract from the excellent 1992 documentary, Black Sci-Fi, produced and directed by Terrence Francis for Moonlight Films and broadcast on BBC2 as part of the Birthrights series.

The documentary focuses on Black science fiction in literature, film and television and features interviews with Octavia ButlerSamuel R. Delany, Mike Sergeant, Steven Barnes, and Nichelle Nichols. 

In this extract, Octavia Butler discusses how her interest in science fiction developed and the genre’s potential for exploring new ideas and ways of being.

Reblogged from codelens

enchanted-dystopia:

rafi-dangelo:

We’re not people really.  Our concerns are not America’s concerns.  We are just here for entertainment. We’re a convenient treasure trove of limitless creativity to be pillaged, watered down, and re-purposed for White audiences and the people getting rich from bastardized stereotypes and simplified caricatures of everything we bring to the table have nothing to say when shit gets really real.

THAT’S WHY YOU DON’T FUCKING EVER TALK TO ME ABOUT MILEY, OR IGGY, OR FUCKING MACKLEMORE.

acceber74:

unrepentantauthor:

masterofbirds:

did-you-kno:

Hawaii was first called the Sandwich Islands.
Source

Pretty sure it was first called  Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui and Hawaiʻi.
The earliest habitation supported by archaeological evidence dates to as early as 300 CE, whereas the 1778 arrival of British explorer James Cook was Hawaiʻi’s first documented contact with European explorers. Cook named the islands the “Sandwich Islands” in honor of his sponsor John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.
Because things only exist when Europeans discover them smh

This. ffs

Reblogged from atane

acceber74:

unrepentantauthor:

masterofbirds:

did-you-kno:

Hawaii was first called the Sandwich Islands.

Source

Pretty sure it was first called  NiʻihauKauaʻiOʻahuMolokaʻiLānaʻiKahoʻolaweMaui and Hawaiʻi.

The earliest habitation supported by archaeological evidence dates to as early as 300 CE, whereas the 1778 arrival of British explorer James Cook was Hawaiʻi’s first documented contact with European explorers. Cook named the islands the “Sandwich Islands” in honor of his sponsor John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.

Because things only exist when Europeans discover them smh

This. ffs

image

Reblogged from nocturnalphantasmagoria

(Source: genderfluidloki)

mocada-museum:

a/wake in the water: Meditations on DisasterAugust 14 - November 9, 2014Opening Party: Thursday, August 16 | 7-10PM | RSVP Curated by Erin Christovalea/wake in the water: Meditations on Disaster is a film, video, and new media exhibition that explores the ways Black bodies experience environmental hazards and natural disaster.In direct response to recent catastrophes like Hurricane Katrina, the BP Oil spill, and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Kevin Jerome Everson, Cauleen Smith, Ulysses Jenkins, Tameka Norris, Danielle Lessovitz and the Institut de Sauvegarde du Patrimoine National utilize found footage, staged reenactments, and performative paralysis to expose the systematic neglect and lingering repercussions Black communities face in the aftermath of disaster.
Accompanying narratives by A. Sayeeda Clarke, Wanuri Kahiu, Muchiri Njenga, Loretta Fahrenholz, and Observatory Media explore impending dystopic and apocalyptic futures to further analyze the state of environmental justice as it functions within the Diaspora.Join us on August 14 to celebrate the official opening of a/wake in the water. Sounds by The Webslinger and beer lovingly provided by Brooklyn Brewery.

Reblogged from mocada-museum

mocada-museum:

a/wake in the water: Meditations on Disaster
August 14 - November 9, 2014
Opening Party: Thursday, August 16 | 7-10PM | RSVP
 
Curated by Erin Christovale

a/wake in the water: Meditations on Disaster is a film, video, and new media exhibition that explores the ways Black bodies experience environmental hazards and natural disaster.

In direct response to recent catastrophes like Hurricane Katrina, the BP Oil spill, and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Kevin Jerome Everson, Cauleen Smith, Ulysses Jenkins, Tameka Norris, Danielle Lessovitz and the Institut de Sauvegarde du Patrimoine National utilize found footage, staged reenactments, and performative paralysis to expose the systematic neglect and lingering repercussions Black communities face in the aftermath of disaster.

Accompanying narratives by A. Sayeeda Clarke, Wanuri Kahiu, Muchiri Njenga, Loretta Fahrenholz, and Observatory Media explore impending dystopic and apocalyptic futures to further analyze the state of environmental justice as it functions within the Diaspora.

Join us on August 14 to celebrate the official opening of a/wake in the water. Sounds by The Webslinger and beer lovingly provided by Brooklyn Brewery.

Reblogged from lostinurbanism

lostinurbanism:

A Sunday Kinfolk Story (Intro and Casting) + Hamilton Multimedia, LLC 

       ”What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?” 

Written by D. VerrtahMarcus Smith (Behind The Lens), Russell Hamilton (Multimedia), King Texas (Creative Director) and myself, Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Lost in Urbanism + Sunday Kinfolk)

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

saucerkommand:

Art by the incomparable Mshindo Kuumba!

Reblogged from felaquelove

(Source: doormouseetcappendix)