Dark Matter: AfroFuturism

flygerianroot:

SIXPAQUEDADI approved.
The simplicity of this photo…
Brilliance.

Reblogged from racework

flygerianroot:

SIXPAQUEDADI approved.

The simplicity of this photo…

Brilliance.

(Source: blackpeopledoshittoo)

sophiebass:

THE A-Z OF DUB
Taken from the 1994 article by David Toop

Reblogged from theawesomefarm

sophiebass:

THE A-Z OF DUB


Taken from the 1994 article by David Toop

Descendants of Slaves and Slave Owners: Family Tree Research - The Root

Reblogged from heytoyourmamanem

heytoyourmamanem:

If you’re interested in tracing your family’s roots, these resources might help. If you’ve done research, have you found any other tools/tips that have been useful?

AFROFUTURISM TAPES 1989-2010 on Vimeo

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

(Source: speculativerace)

Reblogged from atane

adslibitum:

MusiXploitation by Ads Libitum:

shop / facebook / tumblr / portfolio

Reblogged from yodithnprogress

yodithnprogress:

curmudgeoning:

darkmoonperfume:

My Favorite huxtable, she get’s so slept on. I get tired of seeing pictures of tired ass Denise scrolling across my dash

Big thanks to
nickminichino
for bringing the original caption for this blessed photoset to my attention. Truer words were never spoken.

last photo: GPOY

Reblogged from aphotic-eniola

aphotic-eniola:

dynamicafrica:

In honor of International Literacy Day, I compiled a list of some of my favourite books written by African authors (with the exception of the book about Fela). There are many books I could’ve added to this post but these were the first that came to mind.

There’s no order to this list and each comes highly recommended as they, in some way, changed me for the better. If I had to pick a favourite it would undoubtedly be Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions simply because it was the first book I read in which I related so deeply to several of the characters - and still do. From Nyasha’s struggle with depression and being caught between two cultures she feels alienated by, to Tambu’s hunger for a world beyond her circumstances. Ugandan author Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol comes in a close second, it’s just about as cheeky and blunt as I am in some parts and, perhaps a little out of narcissism, is why I enjoyed it.

Between these 18 books you’ll find everything from the personal to the political, and everything in-between. There’s love, there’s romance, there’s struggle, there’s strife, there’s beauty and there’s ugly too. No story is as simple as their titles may suggest, just read Camara Laye’s L’enfant Noir (The African Child) that explores the author’s early childhood in Guinea under French colonisation, or South African writer Sol Plaatjie’s historical novel Mhudi written in 1919 that placed a woman at the center of a story that deals with survival, displacement and early European colonisation in South Africa.

For anyone interested in reading these books, I found some of them available online (not all are complete):

since January of this year, i’ve made it a goal to read more African fiction, and it has definitely been worth the effort. so far, though, i have only been able to read two by Adichie, Nervous Conditons, and The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives. currently, i’m reading African Love Stories edited by Ama Ata Aidoo. but i’m saving these others for future reference. 

shewaslovinme:

mikeandbrunofanfic:

alwayspeechless:

justmoonwalkersthings:

Can someone tell me what is he saying here?

he’s signing “they don’t care about us”

as someone who took ASL I can say that he isn’t saying “they don’t care about us”  after a TON of research and asking around,The first sign is the sign for “god” or “lord” and then he says “is misery I know I will die in doubt” meaning that because of the first allegations there are always going to be doubters that he was in fact innocent. It’s really sad how pissed off he is in this video but that makes it more powerful.

wow.

Reblogged from nocturnalphantasmagoria

shewaslovinme:

mikeandbrunofanfic:

alwayspeechless:

justmoonwalkersthings:

Can someone tell me what is he saying here?

he’s signing “they don’t care about us”

as someone who took ASL I can say that he isn’t saying “they don’t care about us”  after a TON of research and asking around,The first sign is the sign for “god” or “lord” and then he says “is misery I know I will die in doubt” meaning that because of the first allegations there are always going to be doubters that he was in fact innocent. It’s really sad how pissed off he is in this video but that makes it more powerful.

wow.

(Source: zeezpuff)

Reblogged from soulbrotherv2

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Emile Monier (1883-1970)  -  Bronze Medals of Africa. diam. ca, 5 cm.

theatlantic:


This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

Reblogged from nocturnalphantasmagoria

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

Reblogged from chocolatecitydc

chocolatecitydc:

A few of the artists with the curator in front of their work at “I Like My Chocolate Dark” gallery opening. 

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

(Source: jamsradio)

Reblogged from studioafrica

5centsapound:

Émilie Régnier: Mali Passport

via foam: ‘I am really driven by the idea of showing a West African society that is growing,’ says Régnier. That means ignoring the easy and the rote: pictures of elites quaffing champagne, or images cataloguing the atrocities of war. Witnessing with a camera takes many forms. For Régnier, photographic truth is located in the bodily presence of young West Africans proudly negotiating their future, a diverse future of many possibilities.’

timeofbeauty:

Duke, 1968.

Reblogged from atribecalledgoodbreed

timeofbeauty:

Duke, 1968.

Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia

flavorpill:

10 Essential African-American Photographers